A Tale of Three Roofs

In the course of a day or a week, how many houses do you think you pass and observe? Homes can be unique in their style and architecture, but roofs generally fall into one of three broad categories: gabled, hipped and flat.

The type of house usually referred to as “Gambrel” or “Dutch Colonial,” is a prime example of a house with a gabled roof. The gabled roof is characterized by two or more sloping planes supported at each end by triangular wall extensions, known as gables, which occur at varying angles. The actual “gable” is the part of the wall between the sloping roof lines.

Side Gable Roof
Cross Gabled Roof
Front Gable Roof

 

The key to recognizing a hipped roof is that all the roof surfaces slope downward to the walls.  It usually results in the roof having a pyramid-like appearance.


A hip roof on a rectangular plan

A square hip roof (also known as
a “pyramid roof”)

Flat roof with parapet walls

 

The last major type of roof is the flat roof.  This roof is fairly self-explanatory and is evident in so many of the triple deckers found locally. Flat roofs are normally built with parapet walls or eaves. A parapet wall is a continuation of the side walls, or a separate structure around the perimeter of the roof that rises higher than the roof.

Italianate eave with brackets

Eaves are simply that part of the roof that over hang the supporting walls:

Although there are many variations and combinations of these three roofs, if you look closely at any building, you can easily deduce the basic roof type from which it originates.

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