What Condo Association Budget?

condo-budgetCondominium association budgets come in all shapes and sizes. If, like me, you live in a very small association with 2 or 3 units, it may be questionable whether an actual written budget even exists. Large associations, made up of hundreds of units, often have detailed budgets prepared by professionals. In either case, when you went to sell your condo in the past, only the prospective buyer cared about and reviewed the budget. In today’s lending climate, it is standard practice for the buyer’s lender to review the budget. Fannie Mae, the quasi-public company through which most mortgages pass, does not require a written budget for 2–4 unit associations, but does require it on associations of 5 or more units. Many lenders also have an “overlay,” which is essentially an additional requirement that 2–4 unit associations have a written budget. The bottom line is that it is a good idea to have an actual written budget, because it is likely that the lender will ask for it when someone goes to sell a unit in the association.

The lender reviewing the budget will want to see a line item for a 10% reserve. 90% of the annually collected fees must account for all of the regular recurring expenses, and 10% must be saved as reserves. According to the lenders I work with, it is unnecessary to have a separate reserve account. Be careful, however, as buyers looking to get mortgages guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration (known as FHA mortgages) require condominiums associations to meet stricter requirements.

Most condominium budgets can be set up to show a 10% reserve. All obviously recurring expenses, like insurance, water and sewer, the common electric bill, and all clearly recurring maintenance (snow removal, for example) must be budgeted for in a line item. I also recommend some money be put in a line item labeled “maintenance,” because not having any money for general maintenance is not realistic or credible. Expenses that do not come up every year do not have to be budgeted for in advance and can come out of reserves. For example, if your association plans to spend $10,000 in the upcoming year on a new walkway, the budget can still show a 10% reserve for the year that you build the new walkway. The following year, when you produce a “budget vs. actual” report, you would show that you spent the money out of reserves.  As a matter of fiscal prudence, your association may still want to raise fees or collect money via a special assessment, but that is a different conversation.

I always enjoy a good conversation about condominium association budgets, so please don’t hesitate to contact me or write a comment and tell us about your condo association budget.

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