Don’t Renovate and Sell!

home renovationsHomeowners often consider making renovations before selling. They believe the increased value of their home will exceed the cost of renovation. Unfortunately, this is often not the case. For every dollar you spend on renovations, you generally recoup less than a dollar back.  See the annual report in Remodeling magazine, which compiles statistics on the cost recouped of most remodeling projects.

Based on surveys of thousands of real estate professionals, Remodeling magazine concludes that the highest return projects are around 70%, while the lowest are in the neighborhood of 40%. The magazine sends out surveys to thousands of real estate professionals across the country essentially asking for their experience and opinions. The conclusions can’t be scientifically proven, but as the costs of construction are fairly easy to determine there is no reason to doubt the survey’s construction figures. However, I wouldn’t rely too heavily on the specifics of cost recoupment figures. I have seen the surveys they send out and there is simply no way to compile figures in any truly scientific way. Who really knows how much a particular home would have sold for if the kitchen hadn’t been renovated?? Rather, the opinions of thousands of real estate agents, appraisers and other real estate professionals are probably fairly accurate in a general sense. They should be used as a general guide as to which projects result in higher or lower cost recoupment, and very approximately what to expect.

Interestingly, according to the study, renovated kitchens and baths recoup somewhere around 55-65% versus other projects that return more. Common real estate wisdom says that kitchens and bathrooms sell homes. So what’s going on? The answer to this conundrum is that nice kitchens and baths make homes appeal to more people and easier to sell, but are just not valuable enough to recoup the initial investment.

The value proposition of renovating your kitchen and baths looks much better when you do the renovations a few years before you sell your home. You also get the chance to actually enjoy the renovations. Most real estate agents consider kitchens and baths fairly new up to around 3 years after renovation. For example, you spend $50,000 on a new kitchen and enjoy it for 3 years. You then recoup 65% of the cost at sale, so the renovations cost you about $17,500 and help sell your home.

In real life, it may be difficult to plan ahead. However, if you are considering making improvements to your home, considering recoupment values may help you determine what renovations make the most sense in the long term. After making improvements, I often hear sellers say, “Wow, I should have done this earlier.”

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