5 Stats that Determine the Real Estate Market

housingPeople often ask me, “How’s the market?” The answer is clearly subjective, but careful analysis of the following statistics leads to at least an educated subjective judgment:

1.Value

Values or prices are usually expressed in terms of how the median price of closed sales compare year-to-year or month-to-month. Because the seasons strongly affect home sales, I recommend considering the median prices for any given month compared to the same month a year ago:

  • In April 2012, the median selling price of single family homes in the greater Boston area fell 2.5%, and condominium prices were up 6%, compared to April  2011.

 2. Volume

The most relevant statistic for sales volume (the number of homes sold) is the number of homes sold compared to the same month a year ago.

  •  The number of single family homes sold in the greater Boston area was up 11%, while condos were up 18.5%.

 3. Inventory

Take a look at how many homes are on the market compared to a year ago.

  •  The inventory of single family homes was down 10% in April, and for condos the inventory was down a whopping 30%.

 4. Days on Market

Still relevant but not quite as important, are the figures for “days on market and “supply.” This is the average time it takes a home to go under contract.

  •  The average days on market for real estate in the greater Boston area stayed relatively stable, declining two days from 122 to 120 days for April 2012 compared to April 2011. For condos, the time fell 19 days from 117 days to 98 days.

 5. Supply

The “supply” is the number of homes on the market divided by the monthly rate that they are selling. For example, if there are 50 homes on the market and 120 homes sold over the past 12 months (an average of 10 per month), there is a 5 month supply. Most experts consider somewhere between 7.5 and 8.5 months supply of homes a fairly balanced market.

  •  The supply of single family homes was down about 10% from 7.9 months in April 2011 to just 6.4 months of supply in April 2012. There was a 4.8 month supply of condominiums available in April, down sharply from April of one year ago when there was an 8.2 month supply.

 If you can get the answer to these statistical questions for the geographic area (neighborhood, town, city, state, or country) that you are interested in, you should have a pretty clear picture of what the real estate market is doing. So how’s the greater Boston area market doing? My analysis is that the greater Boston area is experiencing a transition to more of a seller’s market. The supply is shrinking and demand appears to be growing, pushing prices up and making it easier for sellers to sell. What’s your analysis?

The figures for this post can be found here on the Great Boston Association of Realtors site.

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Comments

  1. David Russell says

    Hey, Larry–

    Another useful post. I feel fortunate to live in an area of the country where the real estate market has stayed relatively stable!