Converting to Investment Property

Sell or Rent HouseRenting Your Home vs. Selling Your Home

Many of the sales I handle are in urban neighborhoods where people consider keeping their condominium as an investment property instead of selling it. This is more common lately as many homeowners become painfully aware that they cannot sell their home for the price they want. They naturally consider holding and renting the property until the value of their home recovers. However, if a home’s value is much higher than what was paid for it, this strategy has serious tax implications.

Capital Gains Tax Rules  – The Basics

According to Federal and State (Massachusetts) tax rules, gains in value are tax free up to certain limits for people who lived in the home as a primary residence for two out of the last five years. A gain of up to $500,000 for a couple or $250,000 for an individual is tax free when you sell the home. Basically, if you rent your home instead of selling it right away, you have a three year window to sell and avoid paying capital gains tax. Gains on homes not sold in the three year window are taxed at 15% Federal and 5% State. Another option is to keep the property for life and pass it on to your heirs. A discussion of this option is complicated and beyond the scope of this post.

The Three Year Plan

If you hold onto a property and rent it, you will have to deal with one unpredictable variable – tenants. In my experience, the presence of tenants usually compromises your ability to get the highest possible price for the property. Tenants are not usually the best decorators and may not have the highest standards of cleanliness. Plus, it is extremely difficult to make improvements with tenants in the unit. To get the highest possible price, you may have to wait for the tenants to leave, make improvements, and then thoroughly stage the unit starting from scratch. With tenants in your unit, you could get anywhere from 3 to 5% off the highest possible price. The discount may be even greater if the home shows badly, or the tenants make showings difficult or are problematic. Being a landlord carries significant risk.

These costs and headaches must be considered against any expected future increase in the value of your condominium. If you decide to sell immediately, many of these costs can be avoided. There is no danger of a tenant causing wear and tear or making showings difficult. If your home is in good condition and well-decorated, you can probably prepare it for sale without making costly cosmetic improvements and can stage it using many of your own furnishings. Ultimately, you may decide to rent your condominium, but it’s important to be aware of what you’re getting into.

Comments

  1. Marc Rosenblum says

    Thanks for the great information. Makes me think about a lot of things for our current rental property

  2. David Russell says

    Good to know about the restrictions on capital gains tax exemption. I had always assumed that if I turned my home into a rental property, all I had to think about was whether the rents would cover enough of the mortgages for both the rental property and whatever property I bought next.

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